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国际交流英语视听说

Book 4

Unit

2

Protecting Our Planet

国际交流英语视听说

Content

Think and Discuss

Exploring the Theme
Analytical Listening

Sharing Your Ideas
Viewing the World Engaging Further Listening

国际交流英语视听说
Unit 2

Protecting Our Planet

Think and Discuss

Think and Discuss

Questions
1. Look at the photo and read the caption. What do you imagine this scene looked like 50 or 60 years ago? What caused the change? 2. What are some reasons that animals become extinct? 3. Who do you think should be responsible for protecting endangered species? Governments? Companies? Citizens?

An endangered turtle floats over a dead coral reef.

Think and Discuss

Questions

1. Look at the photo and read the caption. What do you imagine this scene looked like 50 or 60 years ago? What caused the change? Example Answers Fifty or 60 years ago, the scene was probably much more colorful, with different species of live coral and different kinds of fish. The damage was probably caused by human activities such as commercial fishing or scuba diving. Rising ocean temperatures from global warming can also cause the death of coral reefs.

Think and Discuss

Questions

2. What are some reasons that animals become extinct? Example Answers Species can become extinct due to over-hunting or over-

fishing , climate change, loss of habitat, or competition from invasive species.

Think and Discuss

Questions

3. Who do you think should be responsible for protecting endangered species? Governments? Companies? Citizens? Example Answer 1

I think governments should be responsible for protecting endangered species because they have the power to pass and endorse laws that protect the species.

Think and Discuss
Example Answer 2

Questions

3. Who do you think should be responsible for protecting endangered species? Governments? Companies? Citizens?

I think companies should be responsible for protecting

endangered species because they sometimes cause environmental damage, and they have financial resources. Saving an endangered species might also be good for a company’s public image.

Think and Discuss

Questions

3. Who do you think should be responsible for protecting endangered species? Governments? Companies? Citizens? Example Answers 3 I think citizens should be responsible for protecting

endangered species because governments and companies have not done enough. Citizens should join together to protect these species through education and public pressure on companies and governments.

国际交流英语视听说
Unit 2

Protecting Our Planet

Exploring the Theme

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN): the world’s oldest and largest global environmental organization founded in 1948. With more than 1,200 member organizations, today it is a leading authority on the environment protection and sustainable development. Almost 11,000 scientists and experts from the world do volunteer work for it. 世界自然保护联盟

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

A | Look at the photos and read the captions. Then discuss the questions.

1. Lions and other types of big cats are dying at a rapid rate. What do you think is the biggest threat to these animals? 2. If a plant species becomes extinct, what effect does this have on the environment?

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

An African lion rests near a tree in Botswana. Over the past 20 years, many African lions have died.

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

Around the planet, human impact has resulted in the destruction of animal and plant life. Now conservationists are trying to save these plants and animals from extinction. Once a plant or animal is extinct, there will be no living members of that species left on the planet.

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

Around the planet, human impact has resulted in the destruction of animal and plant life. Now conservationists are trying to save these plants and animals from extinction. Once a plant or animal is extinct, there will be no living members of that species left on the planet.

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

1. Lions and other types of big cats are dying at a rapid rate. What do you think is the biggest threat to these animals? Example Answers The biggest threat to big cats is probably hunting. People want their skins, or in some cases, they might think the big cats are a threat to people or to domestic animals. Habitat loss could be another factor that is endangering big cats.

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

2. If a plant species becomes extinct, what effect does this have on the environment? Example Answers If a plant species becomes extinct, then any insect species or animal that depends on it could go without food and shelter. In addition, plants are important to the soil and the air, so losing a plant species could have several negative effects on the environment.

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

B | Look at the chart. Then discuss the questions. Each year, the International Union for Conservation of Nature studies plants and animals. Many of the species studied are threatened or at risk of dying. The graph shows the percentage of threatened species in each category. The numbers at the top of the bars show how many species were studied.

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

1. Which group is the most threatened? Which is the least? 2. Which categories of species are common in China?

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

1. Which group is the most threatened? Which is the least? Example Answers Tropical palms have the greatest percentage of species in danger, while lobsters, on the other hand, have the smallest percentage and number of species in danger. Therefore, tropical palms are the most threatened and lobsters are the least threatened.

Exploring the Theme

Protecting Our Planet

2. Which categories of species are common in China? Example Answers All of the categories of species are common in China except for tropical palms, which can be only seen in several provinces. Coral reefs used to be common in the

oceans around China, but a majority of the reefs have been destroyed due to over-fishing and pollution.

国际交流英语视听说
Unit 2

Protecting Our Planet

Analytical Listening

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

dusky seaside sparrow n. 海滨灰雀(主要分布在美国佛罗 里达州的梅里特岛,已经绝迹) habitat n.(植物的)生长地;(动物的)栖息地 Merritt Island 梅里特岛(位于美国东部佛罗里达州) steelhead trout n. 硬头鳟 enforce v. 执行,实施(规定或法律) Idaho 爱达荷州(美国西北部州) deforestation n. 砍伐树林 buckwheat n. 荞麦

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Endangered Species Act (ESA): a U.S. environmental law which was passed in 1973. It was designed to help protect plants and animals that are threatened by extinction as a result of human activities. 《濒危物种法案》

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

People generally speak more quickly than they can write. To take good notes quickly while listening to a lecture, we should write only the most important ideas. Here are some tips: ? Write only the key words. ? Don’t write complete sentences. ? Use abbreviations (short forms) and symbols when possible. ? Indent specific information, such as examples.

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

A | Predicting Content. Form a group with two or three other students. Look at the photos and read the caption. Then discuss the questions below.

The dusky seaside sparrow was a bird species of southern Florida.

Analytical Listening
A | Predicting Content.

Listening 1

1. The dusky seaside sparrow is now extinct. What kind of habitat do you think this bird lived in? 2. What do you think are some possible causes for its extinction?

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

1. The dusky seaside sparrow is now extinct. What kind of habitat do you think this bird lived in? Example Answers The bird is sitting on a branch, so it must have lived in places with trees. Southern Florida is also a warm place with a lot of wetlands.

Analytical Listening
extinction?

Listening 1

2. What do you think are some possible causes for its

Example Answers The bird may have become extinct because of habitat loss, environmental pollution, or disease. (It’s a small bird, so people wouldn’t want to hunt it.)

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

B | Note-Taking. Listen to the first part of a guided tour and look at a student’s notes. Notice the use of key words, indentations, abbreviations, and symbols.

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

C | Pair Work. Work with a partner. Using the notes from exercise B, retell the first part of the guided tour in complete sentences. Use your own words.

Analytical Listening
Example Answers

Listening 1

The dead bird in the jar is the dusky seaside sparrow, a small bird that lived on Merritt Island in southern Florida, but which is now extinct. The species became extinct when people used chemicals to kill the mosquitos on the island. Those chemicals altered the wetlands so they were no longer a good habitat for the sparrow.

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Tour Guide: OK, everyone, here’s our next exhibit. Do you see the body of the little bird in that bottle? That is a dusky seaside sparrow. It was an old male that died on June 16, 1987. It’s kind of sad because he was the very last dusky seaside sparrow in the world. They’re now extinct. Yes, you have a question? Male: Do you know why they became extinct? Tour Guide: Basically, they lost their habitat. See, the dusky seaside sparrow lived only in one place—on Merritt Island in Florida. The island had a lot of mosquitoes and wetlands. The people on Merritt Island used chemicals to kill the mosquitoes. Those chemicals were also very harmful to the sparrows, and many died. In addition, the people on Merritt Island tried to control and exploit the wetlands. As they altered them, the wetlands were no longer a good habitat for the sparrows. The birds died one by one until there weren’t any left.

Analytical Listening
A Guided Tour

Listening 1

A | Note-Taking. Listen to the guided tour and complete the notes. Be sure to use key words, abbreviations, and symbols. Notice the indentations.
Endangered Species Act (ESA)—1973 habitats Protects animals and their ________________

steelhead trout in Washington state Ex.: _________________________________ government Ongoing conflict between ___________ landowners and _________
Ex.: _______________________________ gray wolf in Wyoming and Idaho ESA protects ____________; ranchers feel land law violates ___________ their rights

Analytical Listening
A | Note-Taking.

Listening 1

Endangered Species Today worse Situation today is ___________ than in 1973 > 1,300 1. ____________ species listed as ____________ endangered or

threatened ____________ 39 species removed from list 2. Since 1973 only ______ 3. BUT only _______ removed because they recovered; 14 ______ 9 became extinct, others listed by mistake 4. _______ 300 more species may soon be added to list

Analytical Listening
A | Note-Taking.

Listening 1

Conclusion Even w/ ESA in place, ________________________ not making much progress ___________________________________________

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

B | Listening for Main Ideas. Read the questions and answer choices. Then listen again and choose the correct answers. Use your notes from exercise A to help you.

b 1. What is the main topic of the talk?
a. Why the dusky seaside sparrow became extinct. b. The difficulties of protecting both animals and their habitats. c. Reasons that the Endangered Species Act isn’t working.

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

B | Listening for Main Ideas. Read the questions and answer choices. Then listen again and choose the correct answers. Use your notes from exercise A to help you.

a

2. What does the Endangered Species Act protect?

a. Endangered animals and their habitats. b. Endangered animals but not their habitats. c. Animal habitats but not endangered animals.

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

B | Listening for Main Ideas. Read the questions and answer choices. Then listen again and choose the correct answers. Use your notes from exercise A to help you.

c

3. What has happened since the passage of the Endangered Species Act? a. The number of species that are endangered has greatly decreased. b. The number of species that are endangered has increased a lot. c. The number of species that are endangered has not changed much.

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Discussion. Work with your partner. How might the extinction of the dusky seaside sparrow have been prevented? Explain your ideas.

The Miami blue butterfly

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Tour Guide: OK, everyone, here’s our next exhibit. Do you see the body of the little bird in that bottle? That is a dusky seaside sparrow. It was an old male that died on June 16, 1987. It’s kind of sad because he was the very last dusky seaside sparrow in the world. They’re now extinct. Yes, you have a question? Male: Do you know why they became extinct? Tour Guide: Basically, they lost their habitat. See, the dusky seaside sparrow lived only in one place—on Merritt Island in Florida. The island had a lot of mosquitoes and wetlands. The people on Merritt Island used chemicals to kill the mosquitoes.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Tour Guide: Those chemicals were also very harmful to the sparrows, and many died. In addition, the people on Merritt Island tried to control and exploit the wetlands. As they altered them, the wetlands were no longer a good habitat for the sparrows. The birds died one by one until there weren’t any left. Female: So, if people were to blame, can’t we make sure something like that never happens again? Tour Guide: We’re trying. The situation with the dusky seaside sparrow makes one thing very clear. We need to protect endangered animals. However, it’s a better strategy to protect the animals and their habitats, too. After all, if an animal’s habitat is destroyed, the animal will likely become extinct.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Tour Guide: We’re trying. The situation with the dusky seaside sparrow makes one thing very clear. We need to protect endangered animals. However, it’s a better strategy to protect the animals and their habitats, too. After all, if an animal’s habitat is destroyed, the animal will likely become extinct. That’s why the Endangered Species Act, which was passed in the United States in 1973, protects both endangered animals and their habitats. For example, the steelhead trout lives in rivers and streams on the west coast of the United States—the Columbia River in Washington state for instance. Recently, both the fish and the river came under the protection of the Endangered Species Act.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Male: But how can we protect large areas such as rivers and forests? No one—not even the government—can afford to buy or control all the land that endangered species live on. Tour Guide: Good point. In fact, that’s what makes the Endangered Species Act difficult to fully enforce. There’s an ongoing conflict between some landowners and the government. Take the case of the gray wolf, for instance. At one time, the wolves were common all over North America, but by the 1930s they were nearly all killed. Then in 1973, the wolves came under the protection of the Endangered Species Act, along with huge areas of land—in Wyoming and Idaho, for example. This angered ranchers. They think they should have the right to shoot wolves that threaten their sheep and cows. To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Tour Guide: So, landowners may understand the need for the protection of endangered species, but it’s understandable that they might also feel that the Endangered Species Act violates their rights. Yes? Female: Is the law working? I mean, what is the status of endangered species today in the United States? Tour Guide: Unfortunately, the situation of threatened and endangered animals is worse now than in 1973, even with the Endangered Species Act in place. Reports on topics such as habitat loss, deforestation, and overfishing show that the situation for many species is far worse now than it was in 1973. Let me be more specific. Right now over 1,300 species in the United States are listed as To be continued >>> endangered or threatened.

Analytical Listening

Listening 1

Tour Guide: And, it’s important to keep in mind that not many species are ever taken off the list. Since 1973, in fact, only around 39 species have been removed from the Endangered Species list. But that number doesn’t indicate the complete story. What’s significant about that number is that only 14 species were removed because they had actually recovered. Nine species became extinct, and the others were removed from the list after scientists found evidence that listing the species had been a mistake in the first place. Meanwhile, another 300 species may soon be added to the list, including a plant, the Las Vegas buckwheat, and an insect, the Miami blue butterfly. So, you see, even with the Endangered Species Act in place, we’re not making as much progress as we would like. Any more questions? OK, let’s move on to the next exhibit. This way, please.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

elk n. 驼鹿;麋 Yumi 由美( 人名) Raoul 拉乌尔(人名) hectare n. 公顷(相当于10, 000 平方米) outlaw v. 将(某事)定为非法 pose v. (使)摆好姿势 Virginia 弗吉尼亚州(美国州名)

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Yosemite National Park: scenic mountain region in east-central California, U.S, which is surrounded on all sides by national forest lands and encompasses 1,189 square miles. It is internationally recognized for its spectacular cliffs, waterfalls, clear streams, and biological diversity. It was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1984. 约塞米蒂国家公园

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Shenandoah National Park: a national park in the U.S. state of Virginia. It covers part of the Blue Ridge Mountains (蓝领山脉) and is famous for its wonderful scenery. 谢南多厄国家公园

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Duck Stamp: a stamp which is issued in the U.S. by the state and national governments. The stamp is required to hunt waterfowl (水鸟), and money from selling the stamps goes to support the wetlands where waterfowl live. 美国联邦鸭票

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Hunters and their dogs look for animals.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Prior Knowledge. Discuss the questions with a partner. 1. Ducks, quail, turkeys, and pheasants are popular birds to hunt. Elk and deer are popular four-legged animals to hunt.

What other animals do you know that are hunted?
2. Have you ever gone hunting? If you have, did you like it? If you haven’t, would you like to try it? Why or why not?

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

1. Ducks, quail, turkeys, and pheasants are popular birds to hunt. Elk and deer are popular four-legged animals to hunt. What other animals do you know that are hunted?

Example Answers
Depending on the place, people also hunt rabbits, squirrels, bears, moose, lions, elephants, alligators, and other animals.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

2. Have you ever gone hunting? If you have, did you like it? If you haven’t, would you like to try it? Why or why not? Example Answer 1 Yes, I have. I liked it because I enjoy being outdoors, and it was exciting to look for an animal, even if I didn’t kill one.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

2. Have you ever gone hunting? If you have, did you like it? If you haven’t, would you like to try it? Why or why not?

Example Answer 2
Yes, I have. I didn’t like it because the reality of killing and processing an animal for food was unpleasant.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

2. Have you ever gone hunting? If you have, did you like it? If you haven’t, would you like to try it? Why or why not?

Example Answer 3
No, I haven’t. I would like to go because I want to learn how to use a gun in the right way.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

2. Have you ever gone hunting? If you have, did you like it? If you haven’t, would you like to try it? Why or why not? Example Answer 4 No, I haven’t. I wouldn’t like to go because I think killing animals is very cruel. Besides, I appreciate animals and I don’t eat them.

Analytical Listening
A Student Debate

Listening 2

A | Listening for Key Concepts. Listen to two classmates debating about legalized hunting. Who speaks in favor of it? Who speaks against it?

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Example Answers The woman (Yumi) speaks in favor of hunting. The man (Raoul) speaks against hunting.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

B | Note-Taking. Listen again. Take notes on the speakers’ arguments for and against hunting. Also take notes on their responses to each other’s arguments.

Analytical Listening
Example Answers

Listening 2

Yumi’s Arguments for Hunting ? Hunting helps control animal pops. ? Hunters’ license fees help pay for animal conservation. Raoul’s Arguments against Hunting ? Some hunters are irresponsible. ? Hunting is cruel and causes pain and suffering to animals. ? There is a lot of illegal hunting.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Example Answers (Continued) Yumi’s Responses to Raoul ? Natural predators also eat cows and sheep. ? Cows also suffer when they are killed for food. ? Most hunters are law abiding and kill only what they can eat. Raoul’s Responses to Yumi ? Tourists can also pay to raise money for animal conservation.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

C | Pair Work. With your partner, compare your notes from exercise B. Restate the arguments for and against hunting in your own words.

Analytical Listening
Example Answers

Listening 2

According to Yumi, legalized hunting is good for two main reasons. First, it helps control animal populations, so animals don’t become overpopulated and starve to death. Second, legalized hunting raises a lot of money that is used for wildlife conservation through the sale of hunting stamps. According to Raoul, legalized hunting isn’t good because some hunters are irresponsible. They hunt too many animals or kill them out of season. He also says that hunting is cruel to animals since some hunters let animals die slowly.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

D | Discussion. Refer back to the debate. Which speaker do you think presented stronger arguments? Explain your opinion to your partner.

Analytical Listening
Example Answers

Listening 2

? I think Yumi presented stronger arguments because her ideas reflect reality better than Raoul’s. With a growing human population, animal populations do need to be controlled, and it makes sense to raise money for conservation from hunters who love the outdoors. ? I think Raoul presented stronger arguments because his ideas are meant to improve the current situation. Animal populations do need to be controlled, but that is the fault of human beings. We can correct our previous mistakes by helping the population of predatory animals to recover. We can also be creative in finding ways to raise money for conservation from other people who love the outdoors—not just from hunters.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Critical Thinking. Form a group with another pair of students. Then discuss the questions.
1. Do you think that hunting should be allowed in your area? If

yes, what hunting rules would you make? If no, why not?
2. Some groups believe that teaching children and teenagers about hunting will make them responsible hunters as adults. Should the government try to convince more young people to take up hunting? Why or why not?

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

1. Do you think that hunting should be allowed in your area? If

yes, what hunting rules would you make? If no, why not? Example Answer 1
I do think that hunting should be allowed in our area. We would need to create rules to prohibit the hunting of endangered species, and also to require hunters to only kill the animals of the right age and sex, and only at the right time of the year.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

1. Do you think that hunting should be allowed in your area? If

yes, what hunting rules would you make? If no, why not?
Example Answer 2

I don’t think that hunting should be allowed in our area because there is very little wildlife left, and very few wild areas where animals can live. Hunting would just be more pressure on the survival of animal species.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

2. Some groups believe that teaching children and teenagers about hunting will make them responsible hunters as adults. Should the government try to convince more young people to take up hunting? Why or why not? Example Answer 1 I do think the government should try to convince more young people to take up hunting because being outdoors teaches people about nature. If people love nature, they will be more willing to protect it. Hunting can also be a good activity for families to do together.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

2. Some groups believe that teaching children and teenagers about hunting will make them responsible hunters as adults. Should the government try to convince more young people to take up hunting? Why or why not? Example Answer 2 I don’t think the government should try to convince more young people to take up hunting because hunting is a practice that isn’t a necessity in the modern world. People should eat food raised by farmers in sustainable ways. There is no need for us to disturb wild animals in habitats that are getting smaller every year.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Evaluating Arguments in a Debate
In a debate, speakers take turns presenting arguments for or arguments against a controversial issue. Each speaker provides facts, examples, and statistics to prove that his or her arguments are accurate. Each speaker also tries to show that the other speaker’s arguments are incorrect, incomplete, or illogical. Members of the audience must listen and decide which speaker presented stronger arguments.

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Professor: OK, settle down, everyone. As you know, today we’re going to hear our first student debate. Today’s topic is on the pros and cons of legalized hunting. First, Yumi will present arguments in support of hunting. Raoul will respond to her points and present his arguments against hunting. Speakers, are you ready? Raoul: Yes. Yumi: Ready. Professor: Yumi, please begin. Yumi: Thank you. Well, the main argument I want to make today is that hunting contributes to wildlife conservation in a few important ways.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Yumi: First, uh, contrary to what you might think, hunting actually helps many species survive by controlling their populations. So, for example, without hunting, deer populations would be too large, and many animals would starve because there wouldn’t be enough food to sustain them. Raoul: That’s a good argument, but I think you’re ignoring an important point. Another reason deer populations could grow too large is because we have killed off wolves and mountain lions, um, and other animals that used to hunt deer. So, instead of allowing humans to hunt, we should allow populations of meat-eating animals to recover. Yumi: OK, but don’t forget that wolves and mountain lions don’t just eat deer and elk. They also eat sheep and cows, and that’s, that’s a problem for ranchers. So, this is not a simple issue.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Yumi: Anyway, let me continue with my next point. The second way that hunting supports wildlife conservation is through the sale of stamps. Many hunters have to buy stamps before they can legally hunt birds— for instance, ducks and geese. Oh, and when I say stamps, I don’t mean the type of stamps you use to mail a letter. The stamps I’m talking about are a kind of license to hunt. In the United States, the government’s Duck Stamp program raises more than 25 million dollars annually. And a lot of that money is used for protecting and maintaining bird habitats. Since 1934—that’s when the first stamps were sold—these funds have been used to buy 2.1 million hectares of land for wildlife conservation. So, as you can see, hunters actually help wildlife conservation efforts.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Professor: Thank you, Yumi. Now let’s hear from Raoul, who will present the other side of the issue. Raoul: Thank you. Before I get started, I want to respond to Yumi’s point about money that’s raised through the Duck Stamp program. It seems to me that if hunters need a license to kill ducks and other wildlife, we could also make tourists pay when they visit and observe animals in their natural habitats. In fact, I think that’s what the national parks do. I visited Yosemite National Park last May, and it cost me $20 per car to get in. We could raise those fees if necessary. OK, so to get back on topic, my main argument against hunting is that it’s cruel. Many animals that are shot don’t die immediately. It must be really painful and, um, that’s why hunting should be outlawed.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Yumi: I have to respond to that. Do you eat steak? What about the suffering of cows when they are killed for meat? Do you care about that? Mosthunters are careful to cause as little suffering as possible. Raoul: Maybe most hunters do, but not all. Some hunters leave wounded animals to die slowly and painfully as the hunters pose for photographs. And some, some kill large numbers of animals that they have no intention of eating. In addition, there is a lot of irresponsible hunting that goes on. In rural Virginia—where I’m from—some of my neighbors drive the roads at night, using illegal lights to find and shoot deer. They also shoot deer out of season, and that’s illegal. And in Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, authorities recently caught a group of hunters who were shooting black bears and selling their body parts for medicines.
To be continued >>>

Analytical Listening

Listening 2

Yumi: You’re right that these kinds of violations occur. However, they are rare. That’s why you read about them in the newspapers when they happen. Instead of focusing on the small number of irresponsible hunters, we need to think about the 98 percent of hunters who follow the law and kill only what they can eat. Hunters make it possible for the rest of us to enjoy seeing wild animals in their natural habitat. Professor: I’m afraid that’s all the time we have. Thanks to both Yumi and Raoul for contributing their arguments to our debate. Now, let’s take a vote. Which side of the issue do you find more convincing? After listening to our speakers, are you in favor of hunting or against it?

国际交流英语视听说
Unit 2

Protecting Our Planet

Sharing Your Ideas

Sharing Your Ideas
Language Function

Introducing Examples
We use many expressions to introduce examples. Most of them are placed directly before the example. I’ve visited many national parks, for example, Shenandoah and Yosemite. There’s a wide variety of animals there—for instance, bison ( 美洲 野牛) and wolves. Alligators thrive in habitats such as the Everglades. The Everglades is home to many species of wildlife, including the Florida panther ( 黑豹) and the American alligator.
To be continued >>>

Sharing Your Ideas
Language Function

Introducing Examples (Continued)
A few expressions may be placed after the examples, especially in casual speeches. I’ve visited many national parks—Shenandoah and Yosemite, for example. There’s a wide variety of animals there—bison and wolves, for instance.

Sharing Your Ideas
A | Collaboration. Work with a partner. Each student should choose a different box. Use the information in the boxes to talk about each animal. Create sentences that include a statement and examples. Explain the information to your partner. Use expressions for introducing examples from the Language Function box.

Sharing Your Ideas
Student A

To be continued >>>

Sharing Your Ideas
Student B

Sharing Your Ideas
Example Answers

Student A: 1. Bee populations are decreasing in many areas of the world, including China, Brazil, North America, and Europe, etc. 2. This decrease is caused by a number of factors such as viruses, habitat loss, and climate change. 3. It’s important to follow strategies to protect bees. We can educate the public about the role of bees, pay farmers to protect their habitat, and use nontoxic chemicals, for instance.
To be continued >>>

Sharing Your Ideas
Example Answers (Continued) Student B: 1. Many people are afraid of bats, but bats help the environment in important ways, including eating insects that destroy crops and pollinating plants. 2. Human activities threaten bats. For instance, machines kill bats, development destroys their habitat, and people kill them. 3. We can take steps to help bats survive such as building a bat house (similar to a bird house) or passing laws to protect bats and their habitat.

Sharing Your Ideas
B | Brainstorming. Form a group with another pair of students. Look at the list of habitats in the chart. With your group, brainstorm and complete the chart with examples of plants and animals that live in each place. Then brainstorm about the dangers that the plants and animals face in each habitat.

Sharing Your Ideas
Habitats Animals Dangers

Ice
Desert Rainforest

polar bear, seal, walrus, penguin

hunting, climate change / global warming

cactus, alhagi (骆驼刺),desert fox, climate change / global desert rat, lizard, snake, camel warming, habitat loss

fruit tree, palm, bird, boa monkey, orangutan, cattle,

habitat loss, hunting

Ocean
Other: savannah ________

coral, seaweed, whale, sea turtle, dolphin, fish
grass, lily, antelope, lion, zebra, leopard, rhino

overfishing, climate change / global warming
habitat loss, hunting

Sharing Your Ideas
C | Discussion. Work with your group. Use the brainstorming list from exercise B. Have a group discussion about the dangers that plants and animals face in each habitat.

Sharing Your Ideas
Example Answers ? Native people in the Arctic hunt animals for food, but many other people just hunt for sport. ? Even in the desert, plants and animals depend on small amounts of water. With climate change, weather patterns have changed, and periods of drought can threaten desert life. ? Huge areas of rainforest are destroyed each year for farming crops such as oil palms or for grazing cattle, so habitat loss is an urgent issue in the rainforest.

To be continued >>>

Sharing Your Ideas
Example Answers (Continued) ? Large fish such as tuna are popular as food, but these fish have been over-harvested. Many coral reefs, which are home to millions of fish, are being destroyed by commercial fishing and the warming of ocean water. ? On the African savannah, large animals are being killed for sport or for traditional medicine. These animals are killed so that small parts of them, such as the horns of rhinos, can be sold on the black market.

Sharing Your Ideas
Brainstorming
Brainstorming helps us connect ideas and come up with new ideas about a topic. To brainstorm in a group, we can follow these steps: ? Assign one group member to be a secretary. The secretary will take notes for the group. ? Choose a topic. Say as many ideas about the topic as we can. Do not stop to organize our thoughts or correct errors. The secretary will write down all of the ideas. ? After we have finished brainstorming, look over the list and add any related ideas that we may have missed.

国际交流英语视听说
Unit 2

Protecting Our Planet

Viewing the World

Viewing the World

Crocodiles of Sri Lanka

Viewing the World
Rom Whitaker 罗姆· 惠特克(人名) herpetologist n. 爬行动物学家 reptile n. 爬行动物 swamp n. 沼泽地 bully n. 恃强凌弱者,以大欺小者 enclosure n.( 用于特定目的的)围地,围场 roam v. 漫游 Myanmar 缅甸(东南亚国家) omen n. 预兆 edginess n. 紧张 census v. 统计· · · · · · 的数目

Viewing the World
tapetum n. 毯(膜状层,尤指照膜反光组织,反光色素层) teem v. 充满(人或动物等) solitary a. 喜欢独处的 laid-back a. 自在的,从容的 bask v.(舒适地)晒太阳 territorial a.(兽类、鸟类等)守卫自身活动地域的;地 盘性的 flaunt v. 炫耀 retreat v. 撤退 courtship n.(动物的)求偶 Tyrannosaurus Rex n. 霸王龙(一种大型食肉恐龙)

Viewing the World
the Madras Crocodile Bank: Its full name is “The Madras Crocodile Bank Trust and Centre for Herpetology”. It is one of the largest reptile zoos in the world and one of the oldest nongovernmental environmental organizations in Asia. Its primary aim is to promote the conservation of reptiles and amphibians on the Indian subcontinent. 马德拉斯鳄鱼库

Viewing the World
Yala National Park: a national park in the south-eastern region of Sri Lanka. It is home to a variety of wildlife, including Sri Lankan elephants and many waterfowl. 雅拉国家公园

Viewing the World

Before Viewing

A | Predicting Content. Work with a partner. What is the biggest problem for the crocodiles of Sri Lanka? Brainstorm some ideas.

Viewing the World
Example Answers

Before Viewing

? Crocodiles live in wet areas, so perhaps climate change has caused drought. ? Crocodiles are hunted for their skins, which could be a threat. ? Increasing human populations could threaten the rocodiles’

habitat.

Viewing the World

Before Viewing

B | Using a Dictionary. Some words have more than one meaning. With your partner, read these sentences from the video. Notice the underlined words and phrases. Then read the definitions. There are two definitions for each word or phrase. Choose the definition that fits the sentence from the video. Use your dictionary to help you.

b

1. The only chance the mugger has in the wild is here, in Sri

Lanka.
a. a criminal who robs others in public b. a crocodile of southern Asia

Viewing the World
B | Using a Dictionary.

Before Viewing

a

2. If they die out here, they’re probably gone for good.
a. forever, permanently b. so that things will be better 3. The winner gets the prize—his pick of the females.

b b

a. a sharp, pointed tool

b. choice

4. Muggers have been acting out this ritual for more than 100 million years.
a. a procedure for a religious ceremony b. an activity or behavior that happens often

Viewing the World

While Viewing

A | Note-Taking. Watch the first part of the video. Complete the notes with words from the box.

human habitats for 1. Increased __________ populations less __________ animals crocodiles 2. India: big problem for ___________ mugger 3. Rom Whitaker wants to save the ___________crocodile. rice fields and farms. 4. Indian wetlands are now ____________
To be continued >>>

Viewing the World

While Viewing

A | Note-Taking. Watch the first part of the video. Complete the notes with words from the box.

captive 5. Madras Crocodile Bank—world’s largest _____________ pop. of muggers India 6. Can’t let them go—no place for them in _____________

To be continued >>>

Viewing the World

While Viewing

B | Note-Taking. Some Note-Taking. Watch the next part of the video. Complete the notes with one or two words you hear. the low lands

a few
30 Rom Whitaker wild

Viewing the World

After Viewing

A | Collaboration. With your partner, think of four questions you would like to ask Rom Whitaker about the future of the mugger crocodiles.

Viewing the World
Example Answers

After Viewing

1. Why don’t wild muggers live in India anymore? 2. How do the muggers survive in Sri Lanka?

3. Why is the muggers’ survival important?
4. Is there anything people can do to help the muggers survive?

Viewing the World

After Viewing

B | Form a group with another pair of students. One student in the group should pretend to be Rom Whitaker. The other students will ask the questions they wrote in exercise A. The student playing Rom Whitaker should answer each question as if he or she is Rom Whitaker.

Viewing the World
Example Answers

After Viewing

1. Q: Why don’t wild muggers live in India anymore? A: The habitat is gone now. India’s population has grown, and the former crocodile habitat is now farms and rice fields. 2. Q: How do the muggers survive in Sri Lanka? A: Long ago, farmers here created lakes and ponds in the forest to irrigate their crops. The crocodiles can use those as habitat instead of natural wetlands.

To be continued >>>

Viewing the World

After Viewing

Example Answers (continued)

3. Q: Why is the muggers’ survival important? A: Like any large, predatory animal, the mugger plays an important role in the ecosystem by preventing the overpopulation of other animal species. 4. Q: Is there anything people can do to help the muggers survive? A: People can educate themselves about animal species such as this one. Even though they’re not cute, crocodiles are important to life on Earth.

Viewing the World
A| Narrator: It’s a problem all over the world. Increased human populations mean smaller habitats for our animal neighbors. Nowhere have human populations exploded as in India—and that has meant trouble for some animals. You might think that the mighty crocodile wouldn’t be affected by human population growth—but you would be wrong. Today the crocodile is on the run. Rom Whitaker is a herpetologist. He studies amphibians and reptiles. Rom is determined to save the mugger crocodile from the growing pressure of India’s human populations. Rom Whitaker (Herpetologist): Crocs live in wetlands. But most of India’s swamps and riversides are now rice fields and farms. So crocs have lost virtually all of their habitat. To be continued >>>

Viewing the World
Narrator: Rom founded the Madras Crocodile Bank in 1975 to breed and study native crocodiles. It is a reptile zoo—one of the largest in the world. There are thousands of crocs here including the largest captive population of mugger crocodiles in the world. Rom Whitaker: Another routine day at the crocodile bank sizesorting some of these bullies, getting them into another enclosure. You know, we have 3,000 of these mugger crocodiles here, and nowhere to let them go. People moved into crocodile habitat here in India a long time ago. There’s just nothing left.

Viewing the World
B| Narrator: The mugger once roamed the lowlands in large numbers from Iran to Myanmar. Today only a few thousand are scattered in the wild throughout the Indian subcontinent. Now the last hope for the mugger may lie to the south of India in the country of Sri Lanka. Rom is headed back to Sri Lanka’s Yala National Park after almost 30 years to see if the thriving mugger community he remembers is still there. Rom Whitaker: Really the only chance the mugger has in the wild is here, in Sri Lanka. If they die out here, they’re probably gone for good. To the casual observer, this may not look much like croc country.
To be continued >>>

Viewing the World
Rom Whitaker: But hidden in this dry forest are many lakes and ponds created by an ancient people to irrigate their crops. The people are long gone, but the pools remain. That’s how the world’s largest population of wild muggers has been able to survive.

Viewing the World
D| Rom Whitaker: Hey, a baby croc. Yeah, there you go. There you go. Ah, he’s gorgeous. Look at those colors. For years I’ve wanted to come back to Yala to see how the mugger is doing. It’s not a wellstudied species, so the only way is to see for myself. Finding healthy young ones is a very good omen. But it’s only a start. I won’t really know how things are until I see how the full-grown mugger is doing. Narrator: From this part of Yala National Park, the modern world is not even visible. Rom Whitaker: This is a time of plenty. There’s enough to eat and drink, and the waters are high. The key to everything here is the water—plants, trees, animals. They all depend on it, and life To be continued >>> changes dramatically when it dries up.

Viewing the World
Narrator: The mugger does not make a habit of dining on humans, but any animal coming close to the water to drink better stay on guard. A certain edginess is understandable when 13 feet of reptile could be hidden just beneath the surface of the water. Using its powerful tail, the mugger can reach startling speeds underwater. But its most deadly skill may be patience. Rom Whitaker: Nighttime is the best time to census crocodiles. Their eye shine gives them away. They can’t help it. The reflective tapetum in their eye reflects the light back. It’s really bright ... watch. Man, this place is absolutely teeming with crocodiles. I just counted 140 crocodiles probably, give or take 20 or 30. Muggers can be solitary, but there are times of the year when they come together. To be continued >>>

Viewing the World
Rom Whitaker: One such time is for a ritual that can get quite bloody. Contrary to popular legend— muggers are for the most part pretty laid-back, sociable animals. In fact, they spend much of their time just basking in the sun. But when mating season approaches, they are also intensely territorial, and any spot with deep water is worth fighting for. Narrator: The battles are part of a fierce struggle for dominance. The winner gets the prize—his pick of the females. The combat can be very brutal and sometimes fatal. In the final stage of the dominance fight, this big male flaunts his position by raising his head and tail out of the water. One young male issues a challenge. The big male boldly responds, and the younger croc decides to retreat. To be continued >>>

Viewing the World
Rom Whitaker: It’s amazing to watch this ritual unfold. These crocs could kill each other—and sometimes do—but in this test of strength, the losers usually live to fight another day. Narrator: Finally, the last rival is chased out of the pond. Rom Whitaker: The battle is over; the big male has the pond to himself now. And the stage is set for what’s really important— courtship. Narrator: The victor has won the right to mate with the local female of his choice. Rom Whitaker: The male is all set to mate, but nothing is going to happen until she’s good and ready.
To be continued >>>

Viewing the World
Narrator: It is said that in the natural world, the only real constant is change. But muggers have been acting out this ritual for more than 100 million years—since they shared the world with the Tyrannosaurus Rex. If the muggers can continue to live and produce healthy babies in Yala National Park, they can hopefully survive.

国际交流英语视听说
Unit 2

Protecting Our Planet

Engaging

Engaging
Language Function

Participating a Debate

Responding to and Refuting an Argument
Speakers use specific expressions to respond to an argument in a debate or conversation. First, we must show that we have heard

the other speaker’s argument. Then, we should use a contrast word or phrase to signal that we have a different point of view.

To be continued >>>

Engaging

Participating a Debate

Language Function

Responding to and Refuting an Argument
(Continued) Here are some expressions we can use to respond to or refute an argument in a debate or conversation. Yes, but ... That’s a good argument, but ... Yeah, but ... That may be true, but on the other hand ... OK, but ... You are right that ...; however, ...

Engaging

Participating a Debate

Expressing Encouragement
Here are some expressions we can use to wish another student good luck before a presentation.

Good luck! Go for it! Go get ’em!

Engaging

Participating a Debate

A | Evaluating Arguments. Read the arguments. Are these arguments for or against keeping animals in zoos? Write F if the argument is for zoos or A if the argument is against zoos.

F 1. Animals do not have rights, so it is acceptable ___
for people to keep them in zoos. F 2. Zoos educate people about how to protect ___ endangered species.

A 3. In many zoos, animals are kept in small cages ___ and cannot move around. A 4. It costs a lot of money to keep animals in zoos. ___

Engaging

Participating a Debate

A | Evaluating Arguments. Read the arguments. Are these arguments for or against keeping animals in zoos? Write F if the argument is for zoos or A if the argument is against zoos. ___ F 5. It is fun to see interesting and unusual animals in zoos.

___ F 6. Zoos protect animals that are hunted illegally, such as rhinos (犀牛) and elephants. A 7. People can be educated about animals without ___ keeping animals in zoos. A 8. The artificial environment of a zoo is very stressful ___ for many animals. They often stop eating.

Engaging

Participating a Debate

B | With a partner, take turns reading and responding to the statements in exercise A. In your responses, use expressions for responding to and refuting an argument from the Language Function box on page 28.

Engaging

Participating a Debate

Example Answers 1. Animals do not have rights, so it is acceptable for people to keep them in zoos. (OK, but I think animals do have rights, and zoos aren’t the best places for them to live.) 2. Zoos educate people about how to protect endangered species. (That’s a good argument, but that same education can take place in schools.) 3. In many zoos, animals are kept in small cages and cannot move around. (Yeah, but there are also many good zoos with adequate habitats.) 4. It costs a lot of money to keep animals in zoos. (You are right that it costs a lot of money; however, families with children enjoy going to zoos, so it’s worth the money.)

Engaging

Participating a Debate

Example Answers (Continued) 5. It is fun to see interesting and unusual animals in zoos. (Yes, but it may not be fun for the animals that live there.) 6. Zoos protect animals that are hunted illegally, such as rhinos and elephants. (That’s a good point, but that might make people believe that illegal hunting is acceptable.) 7. People can be educated about animals without keeping animals in zoos. (That may be true, but on the other hand, people can see the animals for themselves at a zoo.) 8. The artificial environment of a zoo is very stressful for many animals. They often stop eating. (You are right that it’s stressful, but on the other hand, it’s better than being killed by a hunter.)

Engaging

Participating a Debate

C | Organizing Ideas. Your teacher will instruct you to prepare arguments for or against keeping animals in zoos. Write down notes to support your position. Try to predict the arguments the other speaker will make, and think of how you will answer them.

Engaging
Example Answers

Participating a Debate

For:
— (Four arguments from exercise A.) — People will protect animals they appreciate, and they can develop that appreciation at zoos. Against:

—(Four arguments from exercise A.)
— It’s time to treat animals with more respect. Their purpose is not to amuse human beings.

Engaging

Participating a Debate

D | Presentation. Your teacher will pair you with a student who prepared the opposite side of the issue. You will hold a threeto five-minute debate in front of the class or a small group of classmates. The student who speaks in favor of keeping animals in zoos should begin first.

Engaging
Example Answers

Participating a Debate

Student A: Zoos play an important role in society for three main reasons: they educate people about animals, provide enjoyment for families, and protect endangered animals from possible extinction. First, the educational role of modern zoos is their primary mission. Many years ago, most zoos were simply … Student B: I understand your point about the importance of education, but because of the poor conditions in many zoos, they are not the best places for people to learn about animals, and certainly not the best places for animals to live. For example, …

Engaging

Participating a Debate

Speaking with Confidence When speaking in front of a group, it is important to appear confident. This will give the impression that we know our topic well, and that we believe in what we are saying. There are several things that we can do to feel more confident. Make sure we have organized our notes and have practiced our presentation at least once. Use hand gestures and body language when we can. Finally, we should remember to pause between sentences and to speak slowly and clearly.

国际交流英语视听说
Unit 2

Protecting Our Planet

Further Listening

Further Listening

Listening 1

baleen whale n. 须鲸(鲸的一类,无牙齿,有鲸须) humpback whale n. 座头鲸(属须鲸类) whaling n. 捕鲸(业)

toothed whale n. 齿鲸(鲸的一类,口中有细密的小齿)

Further Listening

Listening 1

International Whaling Commission (IWC): a global intergovernmental organization which was created in 1946 to manage whale hunting in order to prevent some species of

whale from becoming extinct. 国际捕鲸委员会

Further Listening

Listening 1

Northern right whales (北露脊鲸) are the rarest of all large whales. Scientists believe that only several hundred live in the wild.

Further Listening

Listening 1

A | Read the statements. Then listen to a conversation about saving the whales and check (?) T for true or F for false. T F ?? 1. Most species of the baleen whales are now endangered. 2. A number of countries continue with commercial ?? whaling simply because there is no policy against it. 3. California gray whales are now extinct. ?? 4. According to the conversation, we can help by ?? donating money to the conservation organizations.

Further Listening
Answer Keys

Listening 1

1. T 2. F (They have chosen to violate the rule and continue to kill whales.) 3. F (Gray whales were removed from the Endangered Species List.) 4. F (We can help by learning about whales and their habitats, donating our time to conservation organizations, and altering our behavior to create as little waste as possible.)

Further Listening

Listening 1

B | Read the questions. Then listen again and complete the sentences with what you hear. 1. The endangered status of whales is the result of commercial whaling in the 19th and 20th centuries, when ____________________ meat and oil whales were exploited for _________________. hunting 2. Today, threats to whales include ___________, habitat destruction pollution _____________________ and ___________. conservation efforts 3. Whale populations may recover as the _________________ are working.
To be continued >>>

Further Listening

Listening 1

B | Read the questions. Then listen again and complete the sentences with what you hear. 4. If you participate in the following efforts, you can help protect whales by: habitats ? learning about whales and their ___________; time conservation ? donating your __________ to ____________________ organizations _______________; behavior so that you create as little ? altering your ___________ waste ___________ as possible.

Further Listening

Listening 1

A: Of the 70 species of whales and dolphins, nearly all have been affected by human activities. B: Does that mean that all whales are endangered? A: Not all, but many. Most species of baleen whales, such as blue and humpback whales, have been significantly reduced. Their status today is the result of commercial whaling in the 19th and 20th centuries, when whales were exploited for meat and oil. Of the 11 baleen species, nine are currently endangered. We have evidence that many toothed whales are also in danger of dying. Threats to whales include hunting, habitat destruction, and pollution. B: What kinds of conservation efforts are taking place?
To be continued >>>

Further Listening

Listening 1

A: Many ongoing conservation strategies are helping whale populations. For example, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) ordered a stop to commercial whaling. Unfortunately, a number of countries have chosen to violate the rule and continue to kill whales. B: Can whale populations recover? A: Although it may be too late for some species, there are some indications that conservation efforts are working. For example, the California gray whale, which was near extinction, has made an amazing recovery. Gray whales were removed from the Endangered Species List. B: How can I help save the whales?
To be continued >>>

Further Listening

Listening 1

A: You can help by learning about whales and their habitats. Donate your time to conservation organizations, and alter your behavior so that you create as little waste as possible. If we all participate in these efforts, we can help protect these magnificent animals.

Further Listening

Listening 2

A biologist holds an endangered fish called the smoky madtom (贝氏石鮰).

Further Listening

Listening 2

A | Listen to an interview about the research a fish biologist do and complete the notes. 1. What does the fish biologist do? a. ___________ at a university; teach maintain fish populations b. research ways to _________________________; raise funds for her research; c. ___________ contact authorities to get permission for the research; d. ___________________

educate people e. _____________________ about sustainable fishing. 2. What’s the focus of her research? ______________________________ To protect large freshwater fish and their habitats. 3. What’s the suggestion she gave at the end of the interview? _____________________________________________ Get involved!

Further Listening

Listening 2
T F ?? ??
??

B | Read the statements. Then listen again and check (?) T for true or F for false. 1. All the endangered species of freshwater fish are in North America. 2. The fish biologist feels discouraged sometimes by the bad situation for freshwater fish. 3. The fish biologist suggests that people should volunteer to help clean up the rivers.

Further Listening
Answer Keys

Listening 2

1. F (Endangered species of freshwater fish can also be found in other places, not just North America.) 2. F (No, the bad situation makes the fish biologist want to work harder.) 3. T

Further Listening

Listening 2

Q: What does a fish biologist do? A: Well, lots of things. I teach at a university and research ways to maintain fish populations. I spend a lot of time trying to raise funds for research and contacting authorities to get permission for the research I want to do. And I get to travel around the world and educate people about sustainable fishing. Q: What’s the focus of your research? A: My interest is to protect large freshwater fish and their habitats. Forty percent of the freshwater fish in North America are in danger of extinction. That’s 700 endangered species. And that’s just in North America! Each year, when I join other biologists for our annual meeting, someone reports on the extinction of another species. That’s hard to hear. To be continued >>>
To be continued >>>

Further Listening

Listening 2

Q: Don’t you get discouraged? A: On the contrary, it just makes me want to work harder. I’ve always loved water, and I’ve always loved fish. I’m inspired to do what I can to help them survive. Q: If you could tell people to do one thing to help save freshwater fish, what would it be? A: Get involved! Contribute as much time as you can. Volunteer to help clean up a river, or write letters to politicians to make them aware of the issues. Above all, don’t ignore the problem because things are not going to get better without our help.

Further Listening
authorize v. 授权,批准
grazing animal n. 食草动物 moose n. 麋;驼鹿

Listening 3

Further Listening

Listening 3

United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS): an agency of the U.S. government under the Department of the Interior. It was created in 1871 to help conserve and protect fish, wildlife, and plants in the U.S.A. 美国鱼类及野生动物保护局

Further Listening

Listening 3

Yellowstone National Park: a national park which is mostly in the U.S. State of Wyoming. Created in 1872, it was the first official national park, and it is famous for its geothermal (地热的) features, including the popular Old Faithful Geyser (老忠实间歇 泉). 黄石国家公园

Further Listening

Listening 3

Dictation. Listen to a passage about the Yellowstone Wolf Project and write down what you hear. Altogether the passage will be read to you four times. During the first reading, which will be done at normal speed, listen and try to understand the meaning. For the second and third readings, the passage will be read sentence by sentence, or phrase by phrase, with intervals of 15 seconds. The last reading will be done at normal speed again and during this time you should check your work.

Wolves in Yellowstone National Park

Further Listening

Listening 3

Wolves were once common throughout North America, but by the mid-1930s, most had been killed. In 1995 and 1996, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service authorized a plan to capture wolves from Canada and free them in Yellowstone National Park. This program, known as the Yellowstone Wolf Project, cost only $267,000 in government funds. It was a huge success. Today, the Yellowstone wolf population has recovered and can sustain itself. As the number of wolves has grown, wolves have become the focus of a bitter debate. People cannot ignore the fact that wolves occasionally kill sheep, cattle, and other farm animals. On the other hand, wolves hunt and help control populations of grazing animals such as moose.
To be continued >>>

Further Listening

Listening 3

The presence of wolves brings financial benefits to Yellowstone Park. Tens of thousands of tourists visit Yellowstone annually to see the wolves. Those tourists provide money to help maintain the park and keep it in good condition. The Yellowstone Wolf Project continues to be a complicated issue with strong arguments for and against the effort.

国际交流英语视听说

Thank You!



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